On the “inherent contradiction of being a blind movie critic”

“I soon realized that criticism, be it of movies, music, television, literature or any other form of entertainment, allows you to work through your emotional responses to what you experienced, and by doing so you are bringing into focus the reader’s own emotional responses. It was through critical writing that I was able to see the world more clearly. I chose to be a movie … Continue reading On the “inherent contradiction of being a blind movie critic”

“What’s so Great About Pauline Kael?”

Don’t ask me why, but the library around the corner had a mint condition soft-cover copy of Harold Bloom’s The Western Canon on their remainder rack for $1 (I know, I know, how utterly poetic of them), so of course I bought it, but then I got to wondering, “Didn’t Pauline Kael once have something to say about Harold Bloom?,” which led me to Google … Continue reading “What’s so Great About Pauline Kael?”

Calmly Disagreeing: Stanley Kauffmann (1916-2013)

By Phil Dellio When film critic Stanley Kauffmann died a few weeks ago, Scott was in the midst of a series of posts devoted to rock critics who, at some point in their careers, expressed a declining interest in writing about music. Did Kauffmann ever experience something similar, I wondered? He began at The New Republic in 1957, and he was still at it when he … Continue reading Calmly Disagreeing: Stanley Kauffmann (1916-2013)

Stanley Kauffmann, 1916-2013

Posted on The New Republic this morning: We are saddened to report that Stanley Kauffmann, our film critic of more than five decades, died early this morning at St. Luke’s Hospital in New York at age 97. We will be adding to this tribute throughout the day. The link above contains tributes by James Wolcott, David Denby, and David Thomson (with more to come). I’ve … Continue reading Stanley Kauffmann, 1916-2013